Promotions and News

Food and Gear

Whoa... this time next week you'll all be finished the Blood and getting ready for the Tears.  

With a little less than 7 days until the start gun fires, we just wanted to update you on a couple last minute pieces.  This website is going to be your #1 resource for event weekend and everything here will be our resource as well.  If you have a question - don't hesitate to email us and we'll post our answers here so that they're available to everybody.

Mandatory Gear

The mandatory gear list will be posted here.  At this point we anticipate that the hydration devices, jackets, gloves and hats will be mandatory.  We're running with that stuff every day as the weather has turned more autumn-like here in Golden.  

Cell phones will be strongly recommended.  There is service for nearly the entire course and our website will have electronic mapping (kind of like google maps that will locate you on the trail system).  This e-resource will be a back-up to all of the course markings we're putting out... and you'll be able to see where you are on the course at any time.  Sweet!

Bear Spray is TBA.  So far there have been practically zero wildlife sightings on course so, while we do strongly recommend carrying it (we run with it every day), it will probably not be required.

If you check out the forecasts for the next 7 days... well... let's just say they're looking exciting.  As a matter of a fact, we're supposed to get 10 cm of snow at high elevations on Monday night.  That's just another reason why you should bring some toasty warm clothing and do a little sun-dance for a more promising long-term forecast... it can always change in the mountains!

Aid Station Menus

Assuming the ravenous crew does not get to the food before you do, there are going to be some tasty morsels at the aid stations.  We've got volunteers willing to bail out of their cushy jobs and run for these treats... Well... we are letting them snack up, too.  Here's a quick summary:

  • Ultima replenisher sport drink
  • Water
  • Honey Stinger - gels, chews, waffles
  • GoMacro - Bars
  • Bananas, Oranges, Apples
  • Salty nut mixes
  • Chips, Pretzels
  • Jujubes and licorice
  • Coca-cola (select aid stations)
  • Coffee (select aid stations)
  • Ginger Cookies (select aid stations)
  • Chocolate covered almonds (select aid stations)
  • Watermelon (select aid stations)

Drop Bags and Pacers

A little addendum to this post as this is also critical information for you. 

Drop bags can be prepared for all four aid stations in the Sweat.  Drop bags can be dropped off at registration on Friday or before 7:00 am on Saturday morning to Spirit Square.  Drop bags must all be labelled with the appropriate aid station # (1-4) and your name/bib number.  We will have boxes for each aid station so you will be responsible for making sure it gets put in the correct box.  Anything left at an aid station will be available from the information booth at the finish line, after the last racer finishes (maybe sooner).

Pacers will not be permitted this year as we don't currently have a mechanism to safely incorporate them into our emergency management plan.  Please do take advantage of our crew pass, however, so that you can have a friend or family member meet you at any of the four aid stations on Saturday.

The Right Shoes for the Job

The Golden Ultra was designed to test the ability of a trail runner in a number of different trail disciplines - from the vertical challenge to the ultra marathon and the shorter, flatter, faster race. With all of these different styles of running, you might want to considering having a few shoes at your disposal that will perform on the different terrain and meet the technicality needs.

Salomon, the official footwear sponsor of the Golden Ultra and a pioneering trail and ultra running company has provided us with their recommendations to meet the unique challenges of each day.

Day 1 - The Blood

Consider the Salomon Sense Ultra 4 SG

If there was ever a climbing specialty shoe – this is it!  The Sense Ultra 4 SG is a super lightweight and made to go fast. It’s minimalist and low profile design makes it the ideal shoe for going uphill and the super tacky Contragrip SoftGround sole will give you all the grip you need to climb with efficiency. Sense Ultra 4 SG features include:

  • Minimalist 13mm-heel / 9mm-forefoot cushion for total of 4mm drop 
  • ProFeel Film underfoot protection
  • Endofit bootie for extra comfort
  • Seamless upper construction to avoid potential foot abrasion

Day 2 – The Sweat

Consider the Salomon SpeedCross 3

A fan favourite that fits like a glove. There’s  a reason why the SpeedCross 3 is our best selling shoe – it's super comfortable, very versatile and offers great wear & tear for long distance running.  This traditional drop shoe offers very good cushioning at the heel and provides amazing grip with the super luggy Contragrip sole.  Rain or shine, the SpeedCross 3 will get you up and down this 55km loop with ease.  SpeedCross 3 features include:

  • Traditional 31mm-heel / 20mm-forefoot for a total of 11mm drop
  • Sensifit construction for great foot control on the trail
  • Aggressive yet versatile Contragrip sole for the best grip possible on all terrain
  • Rubberized toe, heel and side protection

Day 3 – The Tears

Consider the Salomon Sense Pro or Sense Propulse

After 2 days of hard racing, you’re feet will definitely be craving some lovin’.  Both of these models offer a great cushioning story with a less aggressive Contragrip pattern for moving fast on all trails.  The Sense Pro is a slightly lighter/low profile design – whereas the Sense Propulse offers precisely tuned cushioning and propulsion for the harder striking runner.   Other benefits also include underfoot protection from the ProFeel Film to avoid those sharp rocks on the trail, and a comfortable Endofit bootie to maximize foot comfort.  Sense Pro and Sense Propulse features include:

  • Sense Pro: 23mm-heel / 17mm-forefoot cushion for total of 6mm drop 
  • Sense Propulse:  29mm-heel / 23mm-forefoot cushion for total of 6mm drop
  • Profeel Film underfoot protection
  • Endofit bootie for extra comfort
  • Seamless upper construction to avoid potential foot abrasion
  • Lighter Contragrip sole pattern for lighter trail use

What’s your Favourite Trailside Snack?

Honey Stinger, the manufacturer of delicious waffles, honey gel and chews, will be providing Golden Ultra runners with the necessary on-course calories to reach the finish line each day. 

“I love natural energy sources, so I’m so excited to hear that Honey Stinger products will be available on course at the Golden Ultra,” says runner Magi Scallion.  “Their pure honey gel is one of my favourite trailside snacks when I need the quick energy boost... their chews are basically the best thing that has ever hit my tongue.”

Honey Stinger products will be included in race packages as well as provided at all of the aid stations on course each day.  The Golden IGA also carries a full range of Honey Stinger product for those runners needing an emergency mid-weekend re-stocking.

Honey Stinger headquarters are located in Steamboat Springs, Colorado and their full range of honey-based products include energy bars, protein bars, energy gels, organic waffles, organic chews, and organic wildflower honey.

The Golden Ultra is a three-day stage running race (or relay) in Golden, BC from September 18-20, 2015.  Runners may participate in all three stages as a solo or part of a relay, or may register for any single or combination of two stages separately.  For more information, please visit www.goldenultra.com.

Massage for Runners

Are you wondering what about the best way to recover between Golden Ultra stages?

While stretching, cold river baths and lots of sleep will be critical, so too will be a bit of massage and active therapy.  We are so excited to announce that Golden, BC's own Element Therapeutics and Claudia Richard from Active Vernon Massage will be available all three days to help your aching bodies!

You can sign up for your massage spot online (online registration now closed - Sept 17) if you're worried about getting the prime spots.  Otherwise we will have sign-up at registration and daily after each event.

Claudia Richard is an RMT from Vernon, BC.  Claudia has extensive event experience including work at SingleTrack 6 and BC Bike Race, not to mention she runs ultramarathons herself!  Claudia is also a certified Active Release Techniques (ART) therapist.

Golden's Kristi Easton is RMT with 6 years of experience working with Canada's Ski Cross teams, including a stint at the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games.  She's also a registered holistic nutritionist so quiz her about recovery food as you're getting your legs flushed.

Element Therapeutics owner, community supporter and physiotherapist Stan Metcalfe will be at the finish line assisting with First Aid when he's not helping runners recover.  

Yoga therapist, yoga teacher, and physiotherapist, Kristie McGregor, will be offering massage service as well as intriguing conversation on total wellness including yoga therapy.  Kristie is particularly interested in movement system impairments and wholistic wellness.

Tessa Keefer is a massage therapist at Element Therapeutics who enjoys both backcountry skiing and surfing.  She has worked at numerous backcountry lodges in BC and in Tofino for 6 years providing apres-surf massage.  

Mountain lover Marie-Michelle Lafontaine finished her physiotherapy studies in 2010 and high-tailed it to the mountains of BC.  An adventure seeker, Marie-Michelle is excited to hear of your Golden Ultra challenges as she helps you prepare for your next run.

Kierra Hautala is one of those elusive Golden-born-and-raised species that is also an avid outdoor adventurer.  Kierra has travelled far and wide to gain experience and training as both an RMT and now Osteopath, and is returning to work full time at Element Therapeutics, starting with the Golden Ultra!

Six Tips for Climbing and Descending

Prepared by: Jen Segger

With just under two months to go until race weekend, there is STILL time to improve and develop your hill running game in time for September’s Golden Ultra. Whether you plan to partake in only one day of racing or take on the entire 3 day challenge, hill running, up and down, will likely be the key to your success!

I’ve been competing in trail running events and epics for nearly 12 years, choosing to mainly tackle races that have daunting elevation profiles. Through practice and focus I’ve learned how to become an efficient climber and to actually embrace hills when I come across them. By focusing on form and technique, I was able to remove fear and hesitation in descending and learned how to save my legs for the next climb. All my coached athletes, whether new to running, veterans or elite, work on hills throughout their training cycle.

Each of the three stages are unique and your legs need to be ready to take on the demands that the Golden Ultra trails have waiting for you. Day #1 is purely vertical, short and sweet covering 1,000m of vertical gain in just 5km. Day #2 begins with a mix of ascents and descents but ends with a long sustained downhill so you want to make sure that your legs are prepared to take on multiple kilometres of downhill running (almost 20km!!!!) and still have functioning limbs for the final day at the event. Day #3 being a mixed bag of everything including a number of downhills that are technical and steep. As you can see, it will be beneficial to have a diverse set of hill skills for this race!

The ABC’s of ASCENDING

Assume Position As you approach a hill, no matter how big or small, determine the game plan for how you are going to get to the top. This might sound simple but many people don’t think about the most efficient way to climb based on the grade of the hill, the terrain (technical or smooth) and the length of the ascent. Set your body position. Stand tall, drop your shoulders and avoid hinging at the waist. Look up to where you want to go and ensure your arms don’t swing across the body. Avoid toe running unless the terrain gets really step. This will help prevent fatiguing the smaller muscles in the legs such as the calves. Then from that position you can determine if it’s a power walk, a steady controlled ascent or a fast and powerful all out climb.

Breathing Longer hills require that you get control of your breath. I do this immediately when starting a hill that is anything longer than a quick up and over. You want to keep your breathing rate steady and avoid gasping for air. Control the rate of your inhale and exhale. Aim to avoid quick, shallow breathing. Dropping the shoulders and relaxing the upper body including the arms will help promote quality and controlled breaths. For short power climbs that are only a few steps or 10-20 seconds in length, a more aggressive pattern can be established that will almost match the rhythm of the arms as they pump forward to propel you up. As soon as you crest over the top though, resume controlled breathing.

Cadence Aim to keep your cadence (or stride frequency) the same regardless of if you are climbing, descending or running flats. Instead adjust your stride length. Focus on short steps for a steep grade. If you need to power walk the hill, do so with purpose. Keep the legs turning over and stacked under the hips. You want your feet moving and propelling you, rather than feeling like you are hauling 2 heavy weights up the hill.

The 123’s of DESCENDING

#1 Little Effort Running downhill should require very little exertion. The more you can relax and let your body move with gravity, the less energy you will expend and the more your quads will be saved. Think about it like this: How you run one downhill will ultimately affect how your legs feel for the next climb that you ask of them. The first part of your body down the hill should be your chest (sometimes called leading with the heart), especially in non-technical terrain. By maintaining an engaged core yet relaxed arms and legs, this is achievable.

#2 Lengthen Out As your speed increases, lengthen your stride but don’t let cadence drop. If the terrain is more technical you may need to sit back slightly and shorten the stride but remember that quick foot work, paired with high cadence will move you over rocks and roots with ease. Regardless of terrain, land on the balls of your feet and avoid heel striking. Aim to have the least amount of foot to ground contact time as possible. Strive for quick, fast, agile feet.

#3 Look Ahead Focus your eyes down the hill, looking to where you want to go and not at your feet. I suggest a 45-degree angle to the ground is a good starting point. The more you practice this, the more your confidence to trust your feet will grow.

Rookie Phenom Joining Golden Ultra Field

Travis Weller may not look like your typical rookie, nor have the running resume to match the rank, but he's only been running since January 2014.  Fuelled by the runner's high, a passion for the outdoors and a world class beard, Travis is coming to Golden in September to test his shoes north of the Border.

Where do you live & train?

I live in San Francisco, CA and train in the Marin Headlands. 

What are your goals for 2015?

My main goal for 2015 is to continue progressing as a stronger and faster runner. I just began running in 2014 and it served mostly as a learning year. I've been coached by Sally McRae since January of this year and have entered more competitive races. My other goal is to race strong enough to begin securing sponsorships for the 2016 racing year. My passions are traveling and running and I'd love to continue traveling to more competitive races in 2016 with the help of sponsors. 

What are some of your career highlights?

My ultimate highlight is becoming part of the San Francisco Running Company family. I've worked there for the past year and it has presented me with countless opportunities. Our local running community is amazing and I am so lucky to be at the center of it. As I am still very new to running and racing, my 2014 racing highlights included a 5th place finish at Dick Collins Firetrails 50 Mile (my first 50 miler) and a 6th place finish at The North Face Endurance Challenge San Francisco 50K. I've raced twice in 2015, winning the Folsom Lake 35K and placing 4th at the Whoo's in El Moro 50K. 

What are you most looking forward to at the Golden Ultra?

Like I mentioned earlier, traveling and running are my ultimate passions. I have never traveled North of Vancouver and I cannot wait to see the landscape that awaits me in Golden. The Golden Ultra courses look breathtaking, both in difficulty and scenic beauty and I can't wait to hit the trails up there. I am also looking forward to meeting the other runners who will be taking part in the races and experiencing the local community in Golden. Last but not least, I'm looking forward to the challenge of running with a competitive field during the Golden Ultra. 

This wasn't enough?  More Travis Weller here:

website: www.tsweller.com

instagram: @beardedgull

The Golden Ultra is a three-day stage running race (or relay) in Golden, BC from September 18-20, 2015.  Runners may participate in all three stages as a solo or part of a relay, or may register for any single or combination of two stages separately.